Antje Blaettner

Antje Blaettner

DVM

Germany

Antje Blättner grew up in South Africa and Germany, graduated in 1988 after studying Veterinary Medicine in Berlin and Munich, and then engaged in her own small animal practice.

In 2001, she took part in a post-graduation course on training and coaching at the University of Linz, Austria, and founded “Vetkom” — a company dedicated to educating vet practitioners and vet nurses on practice management through lectures, seminars and in-house training. Antje Blättner is the editor of “team.konkret”, a professional journal for veterinary nurses and “Veterinär Spiegel”, a professional journal for vet practitioners.

Nowadays, she lectures and trains vet practitioners and vet nurses on client communication, marketing and other management-related topics in Germany and — together with Royal Canin — in over 21 countries worldwide.

Contribution

Communication is a clinical skill (part 1)

Communication is a clinical skill (part 1)

The communication skills that follow are essential for the development of a collaborative veterinarian-client partnership, staff member-client partnership, staff member-staff member relationship. These skills constitute the core of clinical communication skills that can lead to more common ground, enhanced relationships and coordination of care, reduced conflicts and complaints. Inclusion of these skills in every day practice requires us to move beyond what we do anyway to a higher level of intention in the way that we interact with clients and one another. These more effective consultations and interactions also lead to improved outcomes of care including: improved client, vet practitioner, staff member satisfaction, increased understanding and recall by clients, increased adherence and practice success.

Communication is a clinical skill (part 2)

Communication is a clinical skill (part 2)

The communication skills that follow are essential for the development of a collaborative veterinarian-client partnership, staff member-client partnership, staff member-staff member relationship. These skills constitute the core of clinical communication skills that can lead to more common ground, enhanced relationships and coordination of care, reduced conflicts and complaints. Inclusion of these skills in every day practice requires us to move beyond what we do anyway to a higher level of intention in the way that we interact with clients and one another. These more effective consultations and interactions also lead to improved outcomes of care including: improved client, vet practitioner, staff member satisfaction, increased understanding and recall by clients, increased adherence and practice success.

Why invest in communication (part 5)

Why invest in communication (part 5)

In the US, there are 3 times more suicides in the veterinary profession than in the average population and the ratio is even worse for women. Working as a vet practitioner clearly put us at risk of “compassion fatigue”, a very tricky and devastating disease. We are convinced that good communication with the pet owners and with the staff can contribute to a balanced life and help prevent burnout and other psychological disorders. This is an unexpected but very true reason to improve communication skills.

Why invest in communication (part 3)

Why invest in communication (part 3)

In the US, there are 3 times more suicides in the veterinary profession than in the average population and the ratio is even worse for women. Working as a vet practitioner clearly put us at risk of “compassion fatigue”, a very tricky and devastating disease. We are convinced that good communication with the pet owners and with the staff can contribute to a balanced life and help prevent burnout and other psychological disorders. This is an unexpected but very true reason to improve communication skills.

Cookie Settings