Miguel Ángel Díaz

Miguel Ángel Díaz

DVM

Spain

Miguel received a degree in Veterinary Science in 1990. After working at several clinics he opened his own clinic in 1992 which grew from a two-person office to a 24/7 hospital with 17 employees. After running his hospital for 25 years, he handed it over to his team in 2017 in order to concentrate exclusively on his great passion: coaching.

Miguel is the director of the company New Way Coaching, aimed at helping veterinarians become better leaders. He has been educating and training veterinarians in Europe, Latin America, and Asia since 2009 in leadership, motivational techniques, effective communication, handling objections, conflict resolution, influence and persuasion. He spends his days giving individual coaching sessions, private training for his clients’ teams, and workshops and conferences for major veterinary sector companies.

Miguel is an International Coach Certified by the International Coaching Community and the Center for Executive Coaching (USA). He is a Certified Trainer for Edward de Bono’s Six Thinking Hats.

He has been an international speaker at conferences in over 10 countries on three continents. He is the author of the book “7 Keys to Successfully Running a Veterinary Practice”, which has been translated into English, Polish, Chinese and Italian.

Contribution

Communication is a clinical skill (part 1)

Communication is a clinical skill (part 1)

The communication skills that follow are essential for the development of a collaborative veterinarian-client partnership, staff member-client partnership, staff member-staff member relationship. These skills constitute the core of clinical communication skills that can lead to more common ground, enhanced relationships and coordination of care, reduced conflicts and complaints. Inclusion of these skills in every day practice requires us to move beyond what we do anyway to a higher level of intention in the way that we interact with clients and one another. These more effective consultations and interactions also lead to improved outcomes of care including: improved client, vet practitioner, staff member satisfaction, increased understanding and recall by clients, increased adherence and practice success.

Communication is a clinical skill (part 2)

Communication is a clinical skill (part 2)

The communication skills that follow are essential for the development of a collaborative veterinarian-client partnership, staff member-client partnership, staff member-staff member relationship. These skills constitute the core of clinical communication skills that can lead to more common ground, enhanced relationships and coordination of care, reduced conflicts and complaints. Inclusion of these skills in every day practice requires us to move beyond what we do anyway to a higher level of intention in the way that we interact with clients and one another. These more effective consultations and interactions also lead to improved outcomes of care including: improved client, vet practitioner, staff member satisfaction, increased understanding and recall by clients, increased adherence and practice success.

Why invest in communication (part 5)

Why invest in communication (part 5)

In the US, there are 3 times more suicides in the veterinary profession than in the average population and the ratio is even worse for women. Working as a vet practitioner clearly put us at risk of “compassion fatigue”, a very tricky and devastating disease. We are convinced that good communication with the pet owners and with the staff can contribute to a balanced life and help prevent burnout and other psychological disorders. This is an unexpected but very true reason to improve communication skills.

Why invest in communication (part 3)

Why invest in communication (part 3)

In the US, there are 3 times more suicides in the veterinary profession than in the average population and the ratio is even worse for women. Working as a vet practitioner clearly put us at risk of “compassion fatigue”, a very tricky and devastating disease. We are convinced that good communication with the pet owners and with the staff can contribute to a balanced life and help prevent burnout and other psychological disorders. This is an unexpected but very true reason to improve communication skills.

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