Miguel Ángel Díaz

Miguel Ángel Díaz

DVM

Spain

Miguel received a degree in Veterinary Science in 1990. After working at several clinics he opened his own clinic in 1992 which grew from a two-person office to a 24/7 hospital with 17 employees. After running his hospital for 25 years, he handed it over to his team in 2017 in order to concentrate exclusively on his great passion: coaching.

Miguel is the director of the company New Way Coaching, aimed at helping veterinarians become better leaders. He has been educating and training veterinarians in Europe, Latin America, and Asia since 2009 in leadership, motivational techniques, effective communication, handling objections, conflict resolution, influence and persuasion. He spends his days giving individual coaching sessions, private training for his clients’ teams, and workshops and conferences for major veterinary sector companies.

Miguel is an International Coach Certified by the International Coaching Community and the Center for Executive Coaching (USA). He is a Certified Trainer for Edward de Bono’s Six Thinking Hats.

He has been an international speaker at conferences in over 10 countries on three continents. He is the author of the book “7 Keys to Successfully Running a Veterinary Practice”, which has been translated into English, Polish, Chinese and Italian.

Contribution

Everyday challenges

Everyday challenges

This chapter will cover some difficult situations that a vet practitioner can face. With the influence of “Dr. Google”, pet owners have more and more objections: they challenge what the vet says and does… this can lead to conflicted situations. Finally, many veterinarians are uncomfortable talking about money. Suggestions for how to talk about money are proposed in this section of the Focus.

The smooth consultation (part 3)

The smooth consultation (part 3)

This last section focuses on the importance of teaching. It also explains how the perfect consultation should be structured, outlining three different stages. Lastly, we look at difficult situations veterinary practitioners may find themselves in, as well as the best way to deal with emotional blackmail.

The smooth consultation (part 1)

The smooth consultation (part 1)

Vet practitioners frequently concentrate on the pet and forget about the owner… Client centricity requires some preparation and training. The consultation should follow a process where conditions are created to have a positive interaction with the pet owner, starting with a warm-up and using the communication skills explained in the chapter “Communication is a clinical skill”. In this first section, we look at warm-ups and how to establish a good relationship with owners.

The smooth consultation (part 2)

The smooth consultation (part 2)

This section provides some specific examples of different types of questions (open-ended, closed) to ask owners during consultations, as well as additional advice and practical examples to help you improve your listening skills.

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