Iván López Vásquez

Iván López Vásquez

DVM

Chile

Iván comes from a family of veterinarians; his father and older brother share the same passion. He obtained his degree from the Universidad de Concepción in 1991, worked a few years at a small clinic and then shifted his career towards sales and marketing, holding several positions at multinational companies in the domestic pet market in his native country.

Since 2008 he has been the executive director of Vetcoach, a business and organizational consulting company that specializes in the pet veterinary sector in Latin America, where his vision is to create “a new standard for the veterinary world”.

Iván has studied marketing, innovation, coaching and positive psychology. Today he is a strategic business consultant in organizational development and innovation, an ORA Coach (Organizational Role Analysis), creator of initiatives to improve the well-being (happiness) of veterinary students and qualified veterinarians, as well as high-value training programs for veterinary companies and their teams on subjects such as management, wellbeing, communication skills and positive leadership.

Iván has written several management articles for veterinary journals and is an international conference speaker in Latin America.

Contribution

Communication is a clinical skill (part 1)

Communication is a clinical skill (part 1)

The communication skills that follow are essential for the development of a collaborative veterinarian-client partnership, staff member-client partnership, staff member-staff member relationship. These skills constitute the core of clinical communication skills that can lead to more common ground, enhanced relationships and coordination of care, reduced conflicts and complaints. Inclusion of these skills in every day practice requires us to move beyond what we do anyway to a higher level of intention in the way that we interact with clients and one another. These more effective consultations and interactions also lead to improved outcomes of care including: improved client, vet practitioner, staff member satisfaction, increased understanding and recall by clients, increased adherence and practice success.

Communication is a clinical skill (part 2)

Communication is a clinical skill (part 2)

The communication skills that follow are essential for the development of a collaborative veterinarian-client partnership, staff member-client partnership, staff member-staff member relationship. These skills constitute the core of clinical communication skills that can lead to more common ground, enhanced relationships and coordination of care, reduced conflicts and complaints. Inclusion of these skills in every day practice requires us to move beyond what we do anyway to a higher level of intention in the way that we interact with clients and one another. These more effective consultations and interactions also lead to improved outcomes of care including: improved client, vet practitioner, staff member satisfaction, increased understanding and recall by clients, increased adherence and practice success.

Why invest in communication (part 5)

Why invest in communication (part 5)

In the US, there are 3 times more suicides in the veterinary profession than in the average population and the ratio is even worse for women. Working as a vet practitioner clearly put us at risk of “compassion fatigue”, a very tricky and devastating disease. We are convinced that good communication with the pet owners and with the staff can contribute to a balanced life and help prevent burnout and other psychological disorders. This is an unexpected but very true reason to improve communication skills.

Why invest in communication (part 3)

Why invest in communication (part 3)

In the US, there are 3 times more suicides in the veterinary profession than in the average population and the ratio is even worse for women. Working as a vet practitioner clearly put us at risk of “compassion fatigue”, a very tricky and devastating disease. We are convinced that good communication with the pet owners and with the staff can contribute to a balanced life and help prevent burnout and other psychological disorders. This is an unexpected but very true reason to improve communication skills.

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