Cindy Adams

Cindy Adams

MSW, PhD

Canada

Cindy Adams is Professor in the Department of Veterinary Clinical and Diagnostic Sciences at the University of Calgary, Veterinary Medicine, where she developed and implemented the Clinical Communication Program in Calgary’s new veterinary school. She honed her professional understanding of human-animal relationships serving from 1980-1992 as a social worker in child welfare, women’s shelters and the justice system. Animals were frequently involved in that work. Combining the very different perspectives gained from her experiences in social work and a doctorate in veterinary epidemiology, she became a faculty member at the Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph (1996-2006). There she designed and directed the first veterinary communication curriculum in North America and pioneered a research program regarding communication in veterinary medicine.

She helped initiate the Institute for Healthcare Communication, Bayer veterinary communication project. Her research has focused on communication education, veterinary-client communication in large and small animal contexts, animal welfare, companion animal death and human grief. Founder of the International Conference on Communication in Veterinary Medicine, co-author of Skills for Communicating in Veterinary Medicine she has presented widely and advised veterinarians, veterinary practice teams and veterinary educators throughout North America, Europe, Australia and the Caribbean.

Contribution

Everyday challenges

Everyday challenges

This chapter will cover some difficult situations that a vet practitioner can face. With the influence of “Dr. Google”, pet owners have more and more objections: they challenge what the vet says and does… this can lead to conflicted situations. Finally, many veterinarians are uncomfortable talking about money. Suggestions for how to talk about money are proposed in this section of the Focus.

The smooth consultation (part 3)

The smooth consultation (part 3)

This last section focuses on the importance of teaching. It also explains how the perfect consultation should be structured, outlining three different stages. Lastly, we look at difficult situations veterinary practitioners may find themselves in, as well as the best way to deal with emotional blackmail.

The smooth consultation (part 1)

The smooth consultation (part 1)

Vet practitioners frequently concentrate on the pet and forget about the owner… Client centricity requires some preparation and training. The consultation should follow a process where conditions are created to have a positive interaction with the pet owner, starting with a warm-up and using the communication skills explained in the chapter “Communication is a clinical skill”. In this first section, we look at warm-ups and how to establish a good relationship with owners.

The smooth consultation (part 2)

The smooth consultation (part 2)

This section provides some specific examples of different types of questions (open-ended, closed) to ask owners during consultations, as well as additional advice and practical examples to help you improve your listening skills.

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