Worldwide medical and scientific journal for animal health professionals

Issue number 22.3 Dental

Dental disease in dogs and cats

Published 13/04/2021

Written by Javier Collados

Also available in Français , Deutsch , Italiano and Español

Detection of dental disease requires an initial oral examination, followed by a definitive oral examination under general anesthesia. Suitable dental instruments (e.g. explorer, periodontal probe) along with additional diagnostic tests as necessary (such as dental radiographs) are essential for accurate diagnosis.

Dental disease in dogs and cats

Key points

Detection of dental disease requires an initial oral examination, followed by a definitive oral examination under general anesthesia.


Suitable dental instruments (e.g. explorer, periodontal probe) along with additional diagnostic tests as necessary (such as dental radiographs) are essential for accurate diagnosis.


Dental, rather than conventional, radiographs are required for correct diagnosis.


Abrasion

Loss of dental tissue through abnormal mechanical action, caused by foreign objects in the oral cavity (e.g. tennis balls, stones, cage bars).

  • Prevalence: common in dogs; rare in cats.
  • Diagnosis: visual examination and dental explorer.
  • Key point: use an explorer to assess if pulp exposure is present. Determine whether the change in color on the occlusal surface of an affected tooth is due to tertiary dentine (brown discoloration) or pulp exposure (black discoloration).
 

Abrasion © Javier Collados

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