Worldwide medical and scientific journal for animal health professionals

Issue number 22.3 Dental

Oral neoplasia

Published 31/03/2021

Written by Lassara McCartan and David Argyle

Also available in Français , Deutsch , Italiano and Español

Oral cancer is frequently encountered in both feline and canine patients; dogs are more often affected than cats, with oral tumors accounting for 6% of canine cancers and 3% of feline cancers.

Oral neoplasia - an overview

Key points

The most common oral tumors in dogs are malignant melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, fibrosarcoma and acanthomatous ameloblastoma.


The clinical stage, site and histological grade are prognostic for oral neoplasia, and therapeutic options rely on surgery and radiotherapy.


Aspiration of the draining mandibular lymph node and imaging of the thoracic cavity are both essential for proper work-up of oral tumors.


Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common oral tumor of cats; these are challenging to treat and carry a grave prognosis.


Introduction

Oral cancer is frequently encountered in both feline and canine patients; dogs are more often affected than cats, with oral tumors accounting for 6% of canine cancers 1 and 3% of feline cancers 2. The most common oral tumors in dogs are malignant melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, fibrosarcoma and acanthomatous ameloblastoma. In cats squamous cell carcinoma is by far the most commonly diagnosed oral tumor, followed by oral fibrosarcoma. This article aims to give a general overview of oral and oropharyngeal malignancies in the dog and cat, the common clinical signs associated with these tumors, their appropriate diagnostic work-up, and current therapeutic options and prognosis.
 

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